Random Chinese I’ve Learn after 4 years in #China

21 Jan

Hey guys! 

So I was watching a Shanghai film the other night, and was really excited when I found myself recognizing several words here are there. 

I can’t say that I’m anywhere close to beginner, but this year one of my new year’s resolutions is to improve my spoken (and written) Chinese.  So I thought I’d keep track of some of the words I know. 🙂   Also, because I’m learning Chinese as I need it, I thought it would give other people an idea of the Chinese you might want to learn first.   I’m putting the characters on here as I learn them.  So if a character is here, I actually recognize that character. 

  • Numbers (The first thing I learned in Chinese were the numbers because of when I want to pay for stuff). 
  • My Name 🙂 = 奥利维亚 (Olivia | Ào lì wéi yǎ) 
  • Phrases
    • I Want = Wǒ yào (我要)
    • I am . . . = Wǒ shì  (Wǒ shì Meiguoren = I am American)
      • I = Wǒ  (我)
      • We = Wǒmen
      • You (你) = Ní  (Nín =  formal)
      • You (plural) = Nímen
    • I love you = Wǒ ài nǐ ♥ 
    • and = hé
    • ?? =  . . . . . . . . me?    (if you hear “ma” at the end of a sentence, it usually means it’s a question. 😛 
    • Why? = Wèishéme
    • Yes = Duì (pronounced dway)
    • No = Méiyǒu
    • I Understand = Wǒ míngbái
    • I Don’t Understand = Wǒ bù míngbái or Tīng bù dǒng (literally “Hearing but not understanding”)
    • Understand or Not Understand? = dǒng bù dǒng (use this a lot with my students)
    • Good? = Hǎo
    • Bad? = bù Hǎo
    • Good or Bad? =Hǎo Bù Hǎo
    • Good Morning = Zǎoshang hǎo
    • Good Night! = Wǎn’ān
    • Good Bye = Baibai or Zàijiàn
    • Hello = Nǐ hǎo
    • Sorry! = Duìbùqǐ (pronounced Duay boo chee)
    • No Problem / don’t worry about it = Méiguānxì
    • It’s good. It’s fine = 没事。(used if someone made a mistake, but you are ignoring it. Or, in my experience, generally it means “okay, okay”).  
    • Thank You = Xièxiè
    • You’re Welcome = Bié kèqì
    • I Know = Wǒ zhīdào 
    • I Don’t Know = Wǒ bù zhīdào
    • I Like = Wǒ xǐhuān
    • I Don’t Like = Wǒ bù xǐhuān
    • I’m hungry = Wǒ èle
    • I’m tired = Wǒ lèile
    • I’m cold = hěn lěng
    • Happy New Year = Xīnnián kuàilè\
    • Chinese (language) = Zhōngwén
  • People
    • Mother = Mǔqīn (most often “mama” though by children)
    • Father = Fùqīn (slang is “baba” by children)
    • Male = Nán (男) — especially important for forms or bathrooms 😛 
    • Female = Nǚ (女)
    • Baby = Bǎobǎo or bebe
    • Child = Háizi
    • Grandma = Nǎinai
    • Grandpa = Yéyé
    • Brother = Gēgē
    • Sister = Mèimei
    • American = Měiguó rén (Ren means “people” — added to most country names for the people).
    • Teacher = Lǎoshī (Wǒ shì Lǎoshī  = I am a teacher)  . . . . . 
      • Business = Shāngyè  . . .
      • Law = fǎlǜ
      • So I say Wǒ shì shāngyè hé fǎlǜ Lǎoshī 
    • Foreigner = Wàiguó rén or wàijiāo (wàijiāo is more common in my experience)
      • Sometimes (often) we are called lǎowài.  A long time ago, it was the Chinese word for “foreign devil” and had negative connotations.   Today, it’s generally all in good fun depending on how much they like you 😛  It’s just slang in modern language. 
  • Countries
    • America = Měiguó
    • China = Zhōngguó
    • Korea = Hánguó
    • Japan = Rìběn
    • Greece = Xīlà
    • Middle East = Zhōngdōng
    • Egypt = Āijí 
    • France = Fàguó
    • Ireland = Ài’ěrlán
  • Directions
    • Go Straight = Zhí zǒu.
    • Turn Left =  Zuǒ Zhuǎn
    • Turn Right = Yòu Zhuǎn
  • Food
    • One of them = Yi gè
    • Two of them = liǎng gè
    • Cup = Bēi
    • Iced = Bīng
    • One Iced Coca Cola = Yi Bei Bīng Cola
    • Lipton Tea (black tea) = Hóngchá
    • Water = Shuǐ (pronounced “shuay”
    • Coffee = Kāfēi
    • Latte = Kāfēi Ná tiě (sounds like “cafe natee uh”)
    • Chicken = Jīròu
    • Pork = Zhūròu
    • Beef = Niúròu
    • Mutton = Yángròu
    • Fish = Yú
    • Steamed Buns = Bāozi
    • Dumplings = Jiǎozi
    • Small = Xiǎo (小)
    • Middle = Zhōng (中)
    • Large = Dà (大)
    • “A big cola” = da bei bing cola”   
    • To Go  . . .  = Dài zǒu 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: