Tag Archives: Chinese

Random Chinese I’ve Learn after 4 years in #China

21 Jan

Hey guys! 

So I was watching a Shanghai film the other night, and was really excited when I found myself recognizing several words here are there. 

I can’t say that I’m anywhere close to beginner, but this year one of my new year’s resolutions is to improve my spoken (and written) Chinese.  So I thought I’d keep track of some of the words I know. 🙂   Also, because I’m learning Chinese as I need it, I thought it would give other people an idea of the Chinese you might want to learn first.   I’m putting the characters on here as I learn them.  So if a character is here, I actually recognize that character. 

  • Numbers (The first thing I learned in Chinese were the numbers because of when I want to pay for stuff). 
  • My Name 🙂 = 奥利维亚 (Olivia | Ào lì wéi yǎ) 
  • Phrases
    • I Want = Wǒ yào (我要)
    • I am . . . = Wǒ shì  (Wǒ shì Meiguoren = I am American)
      • I = Wǒ  (我)
      • We = Wǒmen
      • You (你) = Ní  (Nín =  formal)
      • You (plural) = Nímen
    • I love you = Wǒ ài nǐ ♥ 
    • and = hé
    • ?? =  . . . . . . . . me?    (if you hear “ma” at the end of a sentence, it usually means it’s a question. 😛 
    • Why? = Wèishéme
    • Yes = Duì (pronounced dway)
    • No = Méiyǒu
    • I Understand = Wǒ míngbái
    • I Don’t Understand = Wǒ bù míngbái or Tīng bù dǒng (literally “Hearing but not understanding”)
    • Understand or Not Understand? = dǒng bù dǒng (use this a lot with my students)
    • Good? = Hǎo
    • Bad? = bù Hǎo
    • Good or Bad? =Hǎo Bù Hǎo
    • Good Morning = Zǎoshang hǎo
    • Good Night! = Wǎn’ān
    • Good Bye = Baibai or Zàijiàn
    • Hello = Nǐ hǎo
    • Sorry! = Duìbùqǐ (pronounced Duay boo chee)
    • No Problem / don’t worry about it = Méiguānxì
    • It’s good. It’s fine = 没事。(used if someone made a mistake, but you are ignoring it. Or, in my experience, generally it means “okay, okay”).  
    • Thank You = Xièxiè
    • You’re Welcome = Bié kèqì
    • I Know = Wǒ zhīdào 
    • I Don’t Know = Wǒ bù zhīdào
    • I Like = Wǒ xǐhuān
    • I Don’t Like = Wǒ bù xǐhuān
    • I’m hungry = Wǒ èle
    • I’m tired = Wǒ lèile
    • I’m cold = hěn lěng
    • Happy New Year = Xīnnián kuàilè\
    • Chinese (language) = Zhōngwén
  • People
    • Mother = Mǔqīn (most often “mama” though by children)
    • Father = Fùqīn (slang is “baba” by children)
    • Male = Nán (男) — especially important for forms or bathrooms 😛 
    • Female = Nǚ (女)
    • Baby = Bǎobǎo or bebe
    • Child = Háizi
    • Grandma = Nǎinai
    • Grandpa = Yéyé
    • Brother = Gēgē
    • Sister = Mèimei
    • American = Měiguó rén (Ren means “people” — added to most country names for the people).
    • Teacher = Lǎoshī (Wǒ shì Lǎoshī  = I am a teacher)  . . . . . 
      • Business = Shāngyè  . . .
      • Law = fǎlǜ
      • So I say Wǒ shì shāngyè hé fǎlǜ Lǎoshī 
    • Foreigner = Wàiguó rén or wàijiāo (wàijiāo is more common in my experience)
      • Sometimes (often) we are called lǎowài.  A long time ago, it was the Chinese word for “foreign devil” and had negative connotations.   Today, it’s generally all in good fun depending on how much they like you 😛  It’s just slang in modern language. 
  • Countries
    • America = Měiguó
    • China = Zhōngguó
    • Korea = Hánguó
    • Japan = Rìběn
    • Greece = Xīlà
    • Middle East = Zhōngdōng
    • Egypt = Āijí 
    • France = Fàguó
    • Ireland = Ài’ěrlán
  • Directions
    • Go Straight = Zhí zǒu.
    • Turn Left =  Zuǒ Zhuǎn
    • Turn Right = Yòu Zhuǎn
  • Food
    • One of them = Yi gè
    • Two of them = liǎng gè
    • Cup = Bēi
    • Iced = Bīng
    • One Iced Coca Cola = Yi Bei Bīng Cola
    • Lipton Tea (black tea) = Hóngchá
    • Water = Shuǐ (pronounced “shuay”
    • Coffee = Kāfēi
    • Latte = Kāfēi Ná tiě (sounds like “cafe natee uh”)
    • Chicken = Jīròu
    • Pork = Zhūròu
    • Beef = Niúròu
    • Mutton = Yángròu
    • Fish = Yú
    • Steamed Buns = Bāozi
    • Dumplings = Jiǎozi
    • Small = Xiǎo (小)
    • Middle = Zhōng (中)
    • Large = Dà (大)
    • “A big cola” = da bei bing cola”   
    • To Go  . . .  = Dài zǒu 

#Chinese Numbers 1 to 100!

17 Jan
Image result for chinese hand numbers
Image Borrowed from China Highlights
0 Líng
1 Yī   

**also called “Yao” if using a series of numbers like a phone number or room number or something.  But if you’re like “I want one soda” it’s Yi.

2 Èr

** also called “Liang” (两) sometimes. In my experience, it’s usually when you are talking about things. Like “I want two sodas” = “Wǒ yào liǎng gè Cola”

两个

 

3 sān
4

**Sounds similar to the word for death. Unlucky number. Many students prefer not to be in the 4th group, in the 4th chair, etc. Best to accomodate them.

5
6 liù
7
8
9 Jiǔ
10 Shí
11 十一 Shí yī
12 十二 Shí èr
13 十三 Shí sān
14 十四 Shí sì
15 十五 Shí wǔ
16 十六 Shí liù
17 十七 Shí qī
18 十八 Shí bā
19 十九 Shí jiǔ
20 二十 Èr shí
21 二十一 Èr shí yī
22 二十二 Èr shí èr
23 二十三 Èr shí sān
24 二十四 Èr shí sì
25 二十五 Èr shí wǔ
26 二十六 Èr shí liù
27 二十七 Èr shí qī
28 二十八 Èr shí bā
29 二十九 Èr shí jiǔ
30 三十 Sān shí
31 三十一 Sān shí yī
32 三十二 Sān shí èr
33 三十三 Sān shí sān
34 三十四 Sān shí sì
35 三十五 Sān shí wǔ
36 三十六 Sān shí liù
37 三十七 Sān shí qī
38 三十八 Sān shí bā
39 三十九 Sān shí jiǔ
40 四十 Sì shí
41 四十一 Sì shí yī
42 四十二 Sì shí èr
43 四十三 Sì shí sān
44 四十四 Sì shí sì
45 四十五 Sì shí wǔ
46 四十六 Sì shí liù
47 四十七 Sì shí qī
48 四十八 Sì shí bā
49 四十九 Sì shí jiǔ
50 五十 Wǔ shí
51 五十一 Wǔ shí yī
52 五十二 Wǔ shí èr
53 五十三 Wǔ shí sān
54 五十四 Wǔ shí sì
55 五十五 Wǔ shí wǔ
56 五十六 Wǔ shí liù
57 五十七 Wǔ shí qī
58 五十八 Wǔ shí bā
59 五十九 Wǔ shí jiǔ
60 六十 Liù shí
61 六十一 Liù shí yī
62 六十二 Liù shí èr
63 六十三 Liù shí sān
64 六十四 Liù shí sì
65 六十五 Liù shí wǔ
66 六十六 Liù shí liù
67 六十七 Liù shí qī
68 六十八 Liù shí bā
69 六十九 Liù shí jiǔ
70 七十 Qī shí
71 七十一 Qī shí yī
72 七十二 Qī shí èr
73 七十三 Qī shí sān
74 七十四 Qī shí sì
75 七十五 Qī shí wǔ
76 七十六 Qī shí liù
77 七十七 Qī shí qī
78 七十八 Qī shí bā
79 七十九 Qī shí jiǔ
80 八十 Bā shí
81 八十一 Bā shí yī
82 八十二 Bā shí èr
83 八十三 Bā shí sān
84 八十四 Bā shí sì
85 八十五 Bā shí wǔ
86 八十六 Bā shí liù
87 八十七 Bā shí qī
88 八十八 Bā shí bā
89 八十九 Bā shí jiǔ
90 九十 Jiǔ shí
91 九十一 Jiǔ shí yī
92 九十二 Jiǔ shí èr
93 九十三 Jiǔ shí sān
94 九十四 Jiǔ shí sì
95 九十五 Jiǔ shí wǔ
96 九十六 Jiǔ shí liù
97 九十七 Jiǔ shí qī
98 九十八 Jiǔ shí bā
99 九十九 Jiǔ shí jiǔ
100 一百  Yì  bǎi

#Chinese New Year’s: Fish and Peppers

10 Jan

#Chinese New Year’s is upon us! I know because there are fish with red pepers being hung!

#Fish around the new years represents “nián nián yǒu yú (年年有鱼)” which means ‘May you have Fish every year.’  Apparently it is pronounced the same as ‘May you have extra each year.  Also the word for fish is similar to the Chinese word for ‘enough’

Apparently the red peppers repesent good luck and income (I’ve had different responses).  

So the picture means – ‘May you have enough of everything you need in the New Year!

Academic Writing Standards (for my Chinese students)

8 Dec

Few reminders for professional or academic writing style of the West.

If you are submitting documents (like graduate school papers, academic papers, professional business documents), there are certain generally expected standards.  For example, 

  • Times New Roman font
  • Size 12
  • Double Spaced (for academic papers)
  • 1″ (2.54cm) margins on ALL sides

The problem is most Chinese writing programs I have seen (including Word and WPS) do not do these methods automatically. I have often had my students complain that their professors marked them down for “formatting” and they aren’t sure why.  The problem is, most programs I’ve worked with here do 3cm margins by default. And they “double space” with a special button checked called “snap to grid” that distorts the spacing.  I highly recommend checking your document ahead of time before submission.  If you fix those two issues, a paper that was supposed to be 8-10 pages is suddenly 6-7 pages.  Go to “Page Layout” -> “Margins” and make SURE it’s 2.54.  Click the spacing button and look at your “options.” Make sure the “snap to grid” button is NOT checked. 

#Business and #Economics: Business Vocabulary with Chinese Translations (Update)

11 Oct

I’ve added new terms to the list of Business Vocabulary.

Don’t forget, the Chinese translations come from the Chinese students rather than professional translators. While I believe they are accurate, you may want to consult professionals before using them for official documents. This is mainly intended to contribute to daily conversation between English speaking Companies and Chinese companies.

Abbreviations:

v. = Verb
n. = Noun
adj. = Adjective
adv. = Adverb

(c) All Rights Reserved. You are welcome to use this material. However, if you do end up using these definitions in your material (educational, informational, or professional), please include either a link to this webpage or the following reference: Blessing, Olivia. “Business Vocabulary with Chinese Translations.” DeceptivelyBlonde.com. This is for two reasons: 1) I’d like to share the resource with others. 2) I created these definitions myself. Thanks!

Divider

Bar Chart (n.) A way of showing information on a chart 图表. The chart shows the information divided up into rectangles. Each rectangle represents one factor and shows the “amount” of that factor.  Allows readers to compare and contrast different things.    条形图 – Tiáo xíng tú

Image result for bar chart

Capital (n.) ~ Wealth (usually money, but also includes other assets) used to buy the inputs and materials used in order to create products. The term has different meanings depending on whether you are an accountant, economist, or financial adviser. 资本 – zī běn

Graph (n.) ~ A way of showing the relationship between two factors in a picture or image form.  Two lines, one called “X” and one called “Y,” are each used to represent one factor.  Lines can then be drawn to show the relationship between X and Y as they change.   曲线图 – qū xiàn tú

Image result for line graph

Input (n.) ~ Resources used to create a product . . . technology, labor, raw materials, etc. Only materials used to make the product, not those used to sell, ship, etc.  用于创建产品的资源

Labor (n.) ~ 1Effort. The work you put into something (“Thomas wants a higher salary for his labor“). 劳动 – Láodòng 劳动是人类生产力为改变商品的使用价值和增加商品的价值的实际使用 2(In Economics & Finance) The number of employees (“When Capital is $15, the Labor is 4 employees“). Usually abbreviated 简短的 “L” in mathematical formulas and economic models. 劳动力 – Láodònglì

Labor (v.) ~ To work. To put effort into something.  劳动 – Láodòng

Loan (n.) ~ Money that A borrows from B and must eventually pay back. Often includes an extra “interest”息 fee.   – Dài

Marginal (adj.) ~ In Business & Economics – A factor of or something that results from small or little changes. Often the profit, cost, or revenue associated with having or making “one more” of something. 边际 – biān jì

Marginal Cost (n.) ~ The cost that comes when you make one more product. 边际成本 – biān jì chéng běn

Marginal Profit (n.) ~ The profit (revenue – cost) that comes when you make one more product. 边际利润 – Biān jì lì rùn

Marginal Revenue (n.) ~ The revenue that comes when you make one more product. 边际报酬 – biān jì bào chóu

Negative Correlation (n.) The situation when two things (X & Y) are related to one another so that if X increases, Y decreases. If X decreases, Y increases. (X & Y go in opposite directions). In economics, we often say two things are “inversely related” if there is a negative correlation. For example, if Price goes up then Quantity Demanded will go down. There is a negative correlation and they are inversely related 负相关– Fù xiāngguān

Output (n.) ~ The number of products created. 产量 – Chǎnliàng

Pie Chart (n.) ~ A way of showing information on a chart 图表. The chart is a circle divided into pieces, each representing a percent (%) of the whole “pie. 饼形图 – Bǐng xíng tú

Image result for pie chart

Positive Correlation (n.) ~ The situation when two things (X & Y) are related to one another so that if X increases, Y also increases. If X decreases, Y also decreases. 正相关 – Zhèng xiāngguān

Quantity (n.) ~ The specific amount of something. Answers the question: “How Much.” 空头 – Kōng tóu.

Rate (n.) ~ 1. The speed at which something happens. For example the “Turnover Rate” 周转率 can tell us how often employees leave a company and new ones have to be hired. 率 – lǜ  2. The percentage of X compared to Y. For example, the “Tax Rate” is how much of the Revenue (Y) is used for Taxes (X). 比率 – bǐ lǜ

Scatter Plot (n.) A way of showing information on a chart or graph. A “Scatter Plot” is a graph where the information does not make a straight line 直线. Instead it is “scattered” (疏散) around the graph. 散点图 – Sàn diǎn tú

Image result for scatter plot

Short Sell (v.) ~ X borrows stock from a stock broker, sells the stock, buys it back, and then returns the stock to the stock broker. 卖空 – Mài kōng

Stockbroker (n.) ~ Someone who buys and sells stocks (a middleman – 中间人).  证券经纪人 – Zhèngquàn jīngjì rén

Stock Market (n.) ~ A place (either a physical market or an online market) where buyers and sellers trade in company shares.  股市 – Gǔ shì

Stock Price (n.) ~ The cost of purchasing one share (股of a company. 股价 – Gǔjià

Substitution (v.) ~ Using one thing instead of another. Replacing X with Y. 取代 – Qǔdài

#Baking Mysteries! Can you pick the right flour? 😜

1 Sep


LOL! My student & I attempting to figure out which of 5,000 available flours I needed for baking. 😜 Is it a #dumpling flour or a #wheat flour or an #all-purpose flour? The Fish kind or the wheat stick kind? The life I live. . . . . . I Love it so much – even going to the grocery is an adventure!

#TMI – So Much Fun! 0_0

20 Jun

Had my annual #physical for the #Chinese residence permit & #Visa! 😷

Managed it alone without a #translator – quite a feat! Look at my bold self go 😜

For #China 🇨🇳 you need: Blood Analysis, Urinary Analysis, X-Rays, Ultrasound, ECG/EKG, and Blood Pressure.

 The X-Rays 📷 are competely #Topless with other people (men included) waiting in the room 😱 for their turn – no protection. 😓 The ECG requires baring it all in front of a major, street level window with no curtain and a ferris wheel🎡 right outside❗ Goodbye dignity, hello #crosscultural oversharing! 😂
 

#Chinese Language Fun

17 Jun

This is why #Chinese is so confusing for the #waijiao (foreigners) – the same character can mean cloudy, moon, feminine, a last name, or genitalia 😂

Whistling Through the Vines

1 Jun

DSC04500

The province of Henan resides in central China, and is home to the largest population here. Although the modern day center is the famous Beijing, China’s history has to a large extent actually centered around Henan itself. Of the six ancient capitals in the country, three of them are in Henan.  If you’ve ever watched some of the popular Chinese martial arts films, you will have heard the names “Luoyang,” Kaifeng,” and “Shaolin Temple.”  I now can proudly say I’ve been to all these places and more! At this point, I’ve visited:

  • Anyang
  • Xinyang
  • Nanyang
  • Pingdingshan
  • Zhoukou
  • Zhumadian
  • Zhengzhou
  • Xinzheng
  • Kaifeng
  • Luoyang

and more! 

This past weekend, I got the opportunity to add a new city to my list — Gongyi (巩义市).  Gongyi is a small city about 1 hour from Zhengzhou (the capital).  On one side you have Mount Song and many hills (beautiful!). On another, it is bordered by the Yellow River, one of the 2 most famous in China. 

Image result for Gongyi map

The entire trip for us was planned by the Henan Tourism Organization (the provincial tourism committee), so we didn’t actually have to pay for anything. However, the cost wasn’t bad at all even if you did pay.  

DSC04487

The bus ride up there costs about 10RMB ($1.50) and was extremely interesting just on its own. We passed the lovely shrine/temple shown above (I’m not exactly sure what that was – we didn’t stop), but even more awesome were the hundreds of Cave Homes we passed!  Here in Gongyi, many people actually still live in caves dug into the cliffs surrounding the area.  Although most westerners think “oh poverty!”, this isn’t actually true.  A lot of these homes are really nice and awesome!  They have running water and electricity, drive up roads, yards and gardens in the front, elaborate front doors, etc.  They are really nice, just inside a mountain. I wasn’t able to get excellent photos since we just drove past them, but sometime I want to go back. 

When you arrive in the city, you’ll see a lot of things dedicated to DuFu (杜甫). DuFu lived in the Tang Dynasty (700s) and is considered perhaps China’s best poet!  According to the Chinese, he was born here and is still revered as seen through the statues and monument decorating the city.  According to the tour guide, the Chinese consider him the #1 literary person to know and he has often been considered the “Chinese Shakespeare.” His ancestral home is here too!

 

SONG TOMBS

Once we arrived, we had a small trek to our restaurant so we walked through the Imperial Mausoleums of the Song Dynasty (960-1279).  Also called the “Song Tombs”, this area is where all but one emperor of the North Song Dynasty are buried.  They include Tai Zu (Zhao Kuangyin), Tai Zong (Zhao Guangyi), Zhen Zong (Zhao Heng), Ren Zong (Zhao Zhen), Ying Zong (Zhao Shu), Shen Zong (Zhao Xu) and Zhe Zong (Zhao Xu).  🙂 

This part was free (it’s just a giant city part area where you can walk around) and was huge for a city park. A great place to take your kids for a picnic! Up towards the tombs themselves are a long row of stone statues that were really interesting. 

DSC04516DSC04511

 

After lunch, we got back on the bus and took about a 20 minute ride to the Kang Mansion (Kangbaiwan – 河南巩义康百万庄园).  “Baiwan” means Millionaire, so this is the home of the Millionaire Kang family.  Considering that they lived hundreds of years ago, that’s a pretty big claim!  

 

The family originated with Kang Ying-Kui in the Ming Dynasty, and its fame lasted more than 400 years (that’s 13 generations!).  According to a monument inside, the family was famous not only for its wealth, but also for its honor. The monument is a plaque written by an emperor honoring the Kangs for having 8 generations of “good, noble, honest sons.”  Apparently, they were loyal, fair, honest, and not corrupt–well worth honoring!

DSC04613

Kang Ying-Kui came to fame by suppressing Bailianism (a so-called the White Lotus Religion– mixed Buddhism with Taoism and worshipped a goddess Wusheng Laomu).  The group didn’t fit in with the accepted religions of the time and allowed men and women to “interact in a shockingly free manner.” 😛 (Apparently they brought a bunch of “groups” together and were a threat of rebellion.  Anyway,  the Kangs were really fashionable and already pretty rich from their own business (river transportation and agricultural products).  There was some sort of phrase like “if you travel 1000 miles you’ll still be on Kang property).  This brought them to the notice of the royal family who helped raise them up even further. 

DSC04619

Inside, there are 19 different parts and about 65,000 square meters.  There are 53 multi-story buildings, 97 “bungalows,” 73 cave homes, and approximately 570 rooms in total.  It was built in the 17th – 18th centuries (1600s-1700s), and the architecture is in the form of the North China “Loess plateau” style.  Basically, that means it was in the era’s feudalistic form (many small buildings with hundreds of carvings and art in the wooden, brick, and stone beams.  It follow strict formality and traditionalism–“building face the street, ports on the river, cave dwellings in the mountains–everything according to its place and order.” In the 1960s and 1970s, their home was one of the 3 largest in China–today it’s the only one of the three that is open to the public. 

Admissions: 30RMB (about $4.50)

Anyone 60 years or older get 1/2 their tickets (I think?).  People 70 years or older aree free.  Full time students can have 1/2 price and children under 1.4 meters are free. People with disability cards are free, as are servicemen and disabled veterans. 

Opening hours: 8:00-18:30

Transportation
2. Take NO.11 bus in Gongyi city to terminal station (1 Yuan) and then transfer to Kangdian town by minibus (1 Yuan).
 
Website: Here

Gongyi Grottos

DSC04814

Fabulous! The Gongyi Grottos is a Buddhist temple created around the Northern Wei period of 479-499 AD.  The statues though are as old as 384 – around the 600s AD.  There is the nearby Longmen Grottos in Luoyang, but the Gongyi set is somewhat more well preserved (although not quite so large). 

DSC04851

To be honest, a lot of the younger people were quickly bored here — but as a historian and cultural student, I found the place truly fascinating.  They have one very elaborate, colored and painted temple area with a tall statue surrounding by the various Buddhist deities on either side.  All set in beautiful painted depictions of myths and stories. 

 

All in all, it was a lovely day full of awesome art, history, and culture. My favorite kind of trip!

Life in #China – Happy Dragon Boat Festival!

29 May

Happy Dragon Boat Festival!  Today in #China we are celebrating the Duanwu #端午 festival!  It’s been a Holiday here for more than 2000 years!

It celebrates the Famous #poet #quyuan. Devoted to #China 🇨🇳, he wrote beautiful poems about its history, nature, and people. When the invading Qin armies approached, he chose to drown himself rather than see his beloved country fall.  Although they sent out many #dragon boats to look for him, they could not save him in time. 
 So to commemorate his memory, every year they eat  #粽子 (aka Zongzi), a sticky #rice #treat wrapped in banana leaves. And the big cities send out Dragon #boats for big battles and races on the lakes and rivers! Cool!

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