Tag Archives: Law School

Bar Statistics Continued (Again :) )

30 Apr

Visit my website here to compare Statistics from February 2013 through February 2016

  • Alabama (21.5%) – Fall of 21.4% from Feb. 2015
  • Arkansas –Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Florida (58.4%) – Rise of 6.4%
  • Idaho (69.9%) – Steady
  • Illinois – Unknown, Statistics not shared.
  • Indiana (51%) ~ Fall of 16% from Feb. 2015
  • Iowa (61%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2016
  • Kansas (50%)Fall of 31.5% from Feb. 2015
  • Kentucky – Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • Louisiana (66.16%) – Rise of 1% from Feb. 2015
  • Maine ~ Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • Massachusetts (50.7%) – Fall of 6% from Feb. 2015
  • Mississippi – Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Missouri (74.3%) – Fall of 3.4% from Feb. 2015
  • Montana (67% including those who have not passed the MPRE, 60% if you don’t include them) – Fall of 7%-14% depending on which number they use from Feb. 2015
  • New Hampshire – Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • New Mexico (69%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2015
  • New York (41%) – Fall of 2% from Feb. 2015
  • North Carolina (26% – if you compare applicant list to passing list) – Fall of 17% from Feb. 2015 unless a bunch of people just haven’t taken the MPRE yet (unlikely, but we’ll hope).
  • Ohio (57.2%) – Fall of 6.6% from February 2015
  • Oklahoma (69%) – Rise of 2% from Feb. 2015
  • Oregon (60%) – Fall of 4% from Feb. 2015.
  • Pennsylvania (56.3%) – Rise of 5.7% from Feb. 2015
  • South Carolina (56.18%) – Fall of 7.27% from Feb. 2016
  • Tennessee (51%) – Fall of 3% from Feb. 2015
  • Vermont (61.3%) – Rise of 15.6% from Feb. 2016
  • Washington (58.5%) – Fall of 7.2% from Feb. 2015
  • West Virginia (50.4%) – Fall of 17.7% from Feb. 2015
  • Viriginia (57.64%) – Fall of 1.5% from Feb. 2016

Bar Statistics Start to Fall Again in 2016 (Week 1)

2 Apr

Bar Results are starting to come out and some of the passing rates seem to be falling again!

  • North Carolina (26% – if you compare applicant list to passing list) – Fall of 17% from Feb. 2015 unless a bunch of people just haven’t taken the MPRE yet (unlikely, but we’ll hope).
  • Oklahoma (69%) – Steady
  • Kansas (50%) – Fall of 31.5% from Feb. 2015
  • Illinois – Unknown, Statistics not shared.
  • West Virginia (50.4%) – Fall of 17.7%

The 2017 U.S. News Law School Rankings Leak: The Top 50

11 Mar

IOWA (MY UNIVERSITY) RANKED #20! Whoop! **DB

US-News-Rankings-Logo-no-year

The 2017 U.S. News Law School Rankings Leak: The Top 50

via Above the Law

After U.S. News & World Report erroneously published a portion of its 2017 law school rankings yesterday — a segment that contained the top law schools in the nation — members of the legal profession, ranging from law students to law school deans, found themselves in a desperate position. Unfortunately, the only information available at the time related to the most elite law schools in the country, and many longed to find out whether their alma mater had improved its position or taken a hit in the latest edition of the rankings.

Fear not, because Above the Law has news you can use. The remainder of the U.S. News law school rankings aren’t due for publication until next week, on Wednesday, March 16, but we’ve got the unofficial Top 50 rankings for you to feast your eyes upon today.

Please note the UPDATE below.

Today’s U.S. News rankings leak comes to us courtesy of Mike Spivey of the Spivey Consulting Group, who broke the news. You can review them here, or at his blog here.

We’ve already discussed them, but here’s a quick refresher on the Top 14 law schools:

1. Yale (no change)
2. Stanford (no change)
2. Harvard (no change)
4. Columbia (no change)
4. Chicago (no change)
6. NYU (no change)
7. Penn (no change)
8. Berkeley (no change)
8. Michigan (+3)
8. UVA (no change)
11. Duke (-3)
12. Northwestern (no change)
13. Cornell (no change)
14. Georgetown (no change)

With that out of the way, let’s take a gander at the law schools outside of the T14. Like last year, we’re faced with yet another rankings orgy, with nothing but ties, ties, and more ties. There are five ties in this segment of the rankings alone (two two-way ties and three three-way ties), with more to follow. Here are the schools ranked 15 – 30:

15. Texas (no change)
16. Vanderbilt (+1)
17. UCLA (-1)
18. Washington University in St. Louis (no change)
19. USC (+1)
20. Boston University (+6)
20. Iowa (+2)
22. Emory (-3)
22. Minnesota (-2)
22. Notre Dame (no change)
25. Arizona State (+1)
25. George Washington (-3)
25. Indiana-Bloomington (+9)
28. Alabama (-6)
28. UC-Irvine (+2)
30. Boston College (+4)
30. Ohio State (+4)
30. UC-Davis (+1)

Both BU Law and Indiana-Bloomington soared in this edition of the rankings, while two law schools fell out of the Top 20 entirely. Emory and Minnesota, you’ve got some explaining to do. GW Law also has some excuses to make, seeing as this is the second year in a row that the school has taken a tumble in the rankings. Alas, it seems like the tide is rolling out for Alabama, which sank like a stone. What happened, Alabama? This law school took the largest rankings nosedive out of the entirety of the Top 50. Ouch.

On the other hand, Boston College and Ohio State are schools that are on the move, in a very positive way. Congratulations to these two law schools — we’re sure the class of 2016 is thrilled to be graduating from a Top 30 school. Another law school that did the right thing is UC-Davis, which finally clawed its way into the Top 30. Well done.

Also notable is UC-Irvine’s upward mobility. Dean Erwin Chemerinsky promised for years that his school would be in the Top 20, and in the school’s second year of being ranked by U.S. News, it’s still moving towards that goal. Don’t stop believin’!

Now, for the rest of the law schools in the Top 50, where there are two two-way ties, a three-way tie, a four-way tie, and two five-way ties. There was A LOT of movement: . . . .

READ MORE

Bar Study Course Poll

18 Jan
Image

Good Luck Bar-Takers! Fighting!

29 Jul

February 2015 Bar Results – Week 7

17 May

At the end of week 7 the following states have released their bar results:

**Statistics are compared against February 2014

For other bar exam release dates, check my Bar Results page.  Or go here for past and present statistics.  If you have news about other states, please let me know!

GOOD LUCK!

February 2015 Bar Results – Week 6

9 May

At the end of week 6 the following states have released their bar results:

**Statistics are compared against February 2014

For other bar exam release dates, check my Bar Results page.  Or go here for past and present statistics.  If you have news about other states, please let me know!

GOOD LUCK!

February 2015 Bar Results – Week 5

2 May

At the end of week 5 the following states have released their bar results:

**Statistics are compared against February 2014

For other bar exam release dates, check my Bar Results page.  Or go here for past and present statistics.  If you have news about other states, please let me know!

GOOD LUCK!

February 2015 Bar Results – Week 4

27 Apr

At the end of week 4 the following states have released their bar results:

**Statistics are compared against February 2014

For other bar exam release dates, check my Bar Results page.  Or go here for past and present statistics.  If you have news about other states, please let me know!

GOOD LUCK!

Vermont is Out and It is Shocking

25 Apr

The Vermont Supreme Court has officially posted their results, and it isn’t good.  

Of the 40 people who took the exam, only 19 passed it. 

19!

That’s less than half! (47.5% to be exact)

This is a sharp different from 2013 and 2014, and it offers further proof that there is a significant downward trend in numbers.  

Over the last 2 years, here are the February and July passage rates:

  • February 2013 – 83%
  • July 2013 – 72%
  • February 2014 – 68%
  • July 2014 – 66%
  • February 2015 – 47.5%

That is a stunning drop of 21% from 2014 and 36% from 2013.  And if the spread remains the same for July, it will be even less than 47% (each year since 2013, July has been lower than February).  

And the other states statistics are looking bad as well. Of all the states reporting right now, only Louisiana shows a hike in numbers. Everyone else has fallen, and some like Ohio and Vermont have fallen pretty far.

It’s hard to imagine how such a serious fall could be purely student related. I find it hard to believe that there isn’t something else going on behind the scenes. The evidence suggests the test is getting harder, and that’s not good.

It begs the question of what responsibilities the Bar Examiners owe to the students. What duty do they have to share important information (such as a stricter exam) with students and how early?

Bar Examiners aren’t acknowledging it, but the fact is, many students use bar passage rates as a significant factor when choosing law schools and future homes.  For example, California is notoriously difficult, so unless you really, really love California, we tend to avoid it. And as for choosing law schools, it’s like any other college decision – you generally find that the better schools have the better passage rates in their state. 

So the problem is three fold. 

  1. We use the passage rates to influence which state we choose.
  2. We use which state we choose to influence which college we choose.
  3. We use the passage rates to influence which school we choose.

Altogether, it feels a little like we were lied to when things like the current fall happen.  They give out these statistics, and they stay pretty stable year in and year out, so you start to rely on it. You make important, hundred of thousands of dollars decisions based on those statistics. You plan your life based in no small part on the belief that you have a chance, because you’ve seen the statistics.

And then the fall comes. People start failing in unexpected numbers, and it starts looking more and more like the schools and examiners have screwed you over with the statistics.  

How soon should they have to tell you that the exam is about to get harder?

1 year? – before you pay for the bar?

2 years? – before you start studying and when you are making plans for which state you choose?

3 years? – Before you choose the law school, before you’ve made life-changing decisions?

Personally, I’m going to say 3 years. We should be given a three-year heads up before the examiners make any decisions about making the exam harder. We rely on the past statistics, and it’s completely reasonable that we do so. We make huge life- and monetary- decision based on those statistics; it’s a really big thing.  You can’t just change things without given us ample warning and time to work around those changes.

 

%d bloggers like this: