Beautiful Women

30 Sep

I love “Say Yes to the Dress” – Watching that moment when a woman finally feels just as beautiful as she truly is. Even if I don’t like the dress itself, it’s just that look on a woman’s face when she is confident and feels like the amazing person she always felt like she was on the inside is finally showing up on the outside – it’s amazing. Truly confident women just glow. I wish we all felt that way all the time. That’s what fashion should truly be. Fashion should be about helping people find their souls and confidence through their clothing. About finding the things that are beautiful about them and bringing them out. About helping them realize that all those little flaws they see can disappear if they focus on the beautiful parts. Every single person is beautiful. True Beauty isn’t measured by symmetry or height or weight or lack of scars or the length of a nose. True Beauty is the size of your smile, the determination in your eyes, the confidence in your shoulders, the steel in your back, the sexy flair in your walk. And that’s something that any person can have, they just have to look inside and bring it out. And find that style that shows it 🙂 I’ve yet to meet a confident woman who didn’t just shine with beauty. We need to stop worrying about how other’s dress or what other’s will think about our style. Just pick something that shows the world who you are inside! Since you’re amazing, style that reflects you will naturally be amazing too 🙂 We just need to walk tall and show off our inner sassy, totally brilliant selves with pride! 👗

Also, Elizabeth, do you remember that week we sat and watched like fifty episodes of this show in a row? That was an awesome time 🙂 Happy memories!

Artsy Wheels

26 Sep

New Corporate Governance Vocabulary

23 Sep

I’ve added new terms to the list of Business or Corporate Governance Vocabulary

Don’t forget, the Chinese translations come from the Chinese students rather than professional translators. While I believe they are accurate, you may want to consult professionals before using them for official documents. This is mainly intended to contribute to daily conversation between English speaking Companies and Chinese companies.

Abbreviations:

v. = Verb
n. = Noun
adj. = Adjective
adv. = Adverb

(c) All Rights Reserved. You are welcome to use this material. However, if you do end up using these definitions in your material (educational, informational, or professional), please include either a link to this webpage or the following reference: Blessing, Olivia. “Corporate Governance Vocabulary.” DeceptivelyBlonde.com. This is for two reasons: 1) I’d like to share the resource with others. 2) I created these definitions myself. Thanks!

Appoint (v.) ~

  1. To select a person or group of people for specific work or for an official job . 委任 –Wěi rèn
  2. To select a specific time or date for an event. 任命 – Rèn mìng

 

Assets (n.) ~ Anything valuable or of worth that belongs to the company. Found on the Balance Sheet. 资产 – Zīchǎn

Balance of Power (n.) ~ The issue of whether power or authority is equally shared among the people so that no one person or group is stronger than the others. 均势 – Jūnshì / 权力平衡 – Quánlì Pínghéng

Business Practices (n.) ~ The usual methods, procedures, systems, traditions, and rules used by a company in accomplishing its goals. 商业惯例 – Shāngyè guànlì

Chairman (n.) ~ The Chief Officer of a company, appointed as the head of the Board of Directors. Responsible for developing corporate policy and supervising  the Executives. 董事长 – Dǒng Shì Zhǎng

Contribute (v.) ~ To give something (time, money, goods, effort, thoughts, ideas) as part of helping a group accomplish something. (Example – My contribution to the project was the Powerpoint I did)贡献 – Gòngxiàn

Controls (n.) ~ Rules or Restrictions use to limit or regulate something. 管制- Guǎnzhì

Corporate Structure (n.) ~ The system or plan for organizing a corporation’s groups, committees, and people. 公司结构 – Gōngsī Jiégòu

Decide (v.) ~ To make a conclusion or final choice about something. 决定 – Juédìng

Decision (n.) ~ A conclusion or final choice about something. 决议 – Juéyì

Director (n.) ~ Member of the Board of Directors which monitors the Executive Staff, works with the Shareholders, and makes some of the most significant decisions about the company’s purpose, values, ethics, goals, major activities, and future. 董事 – Dǒngshì

Executive (n.) ~ The senior manager or officer in charge of a specific area of the company who is responsible for making and implementing the significant day-to-day decisions. 高管 – Gāo Guǎn

Financial (adj.) ~ Connected to or associated with money or finances. – Cái / 金融 – Jīn róng

Fiscal (adj.) ~ Connected to or associated with money or finances (usually in terms of the cash flow, assets, and liabilities of a company). 财政 – Cái Zhèng

Liabilities (n.) ~ All debts or financial obligations a company owes . Found on the Balance Sheet. 负债 – Fùzhài

Member (n.) ~ Someone who has fulfilled all the requirements and been accepted into the group. (Example – “I am a member of the Wēixìn Group for my class”)  会员 – Huìyuán

Membership (n.) ~ One’s position as part of a group. The fact that someone has fulfilled all the requirements and been accepted into a specific group. (Example – “I have a membership with the gym.”) 会籍 – Huì Jí / 会员资格 – Huìyuán Zīgé

Minimum (n.) ~ The lowest possible amount of something. 最低限度 – Zuìdī Xiàndù

Nomination (n.) ~ The official recommendation or suggestion that someone deserves a specific job. 提名 – Tímíng

Performance (n.) ~ The way someone does their work. When reviewed by others, performance is usually judged by its effectiveness and efficiency. (Example – Your performance was very good; you did the job quickly and correctly). 绩效 – Jīxiào

Relevant (adj.) ~ Directly linked to or important to the issue being considered (Example – Whether or not the product test is successful is relevant to whether we sell it this year or not). 相应 – Xiāng yìng

Remuneration (n.) ~ The payment or reward a person gets for doing their job. 报酬 – Bàochóu

Report (n.) ~ A detailed account or explanation (written or spoken) about the person, group, or company’s activities, work, situation, research, etc汇报 – Huìbào

Report (v.) ~ To give the report to the audience. 报告 – Bàogào

Review (v.) ~ To examine or look over something to make sure it is correct, complete, adequate, or that you understand it. 回顾 – Huígù 

Risk (n.) ~ Something that puts important or valuable items in danger of being destroyed, damaged, or lost. 风险 – Fēngxiǎn

Strategy (n.) ~ A plan or method of accomplishing something. 战略 – Zhànlüè

 

Photo above is not mine. All Rights go to Suzanne Dibble, on who’s website I found the photo.

Chinese Dragon & Lion Dance

21 Sep

The Traditional Chinese Dragon & Lion Dance! Part of a show performed by students at the University for the “Welcoming Freshmen Candlelighting Ceremony” #ChinaTravel #LifeinChina #ChineseCulture

My Students Precisely

21 Sep
Image

US Ambassador to China visits Our University!

20 Sep

Life in China ~ The Chicken Song

20 Sep

The College Students at our Chinese University put on a performance for the Freshmen Welcoming Ceremony! This was the Chicken Song (or I think it was a chicken song?) – To be honest, we weren…

Source: The Chicken Song

Art I Love – Wildflowers

19 Sep

Wildflowers by Pol Ledant

Happy Mid-Autumn Festival

15 Sep

Image result for mid-autumn festival

Happy Mid-Autumn Festival from China to you!

Today (September 15, 2016) is the Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival (Zhong Qiu Jie). The festival will fall on the 15th day of the 8th month on the lunar calendar, which just so happens to be today for 2016.  Although today is the official day of the holiday, most people in China will take a 3-4 day weekend to celebrate.🙂 For example, at our university all classes are cancelled for Thursday – Saturday, with Friday’s classes made up on Sunday.
Based on the lunar calendar, on the 15th of the month, the moon should be a full moon, shining bright and beautiful.  So a lot of the stickers and pictures being sent around WeChat (Chinese version of Facebook) are full moons or things shaped like full moons. :) 

The moon has a special place in the world of Chinese art and culture, with many of my students great enthusiasts of the “romantic and beautiful night sky.” So during the Song Dynasty, the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Festival was created to celebrate the Harvest Moon. This is supposed to be the brightest, biggest, most beautiful moon of the year. 

One of the best and largest part of the Mid-Autumn Festival is the tradition of eating what are called “Moon cakes” (月饼 – Yuè Bĭng).  Moon Cakes are little pastries or cakes about 4 inches around and 2 inches thick.  The pastry crust tends to be pretty thick and then inside are any variety of treats or fillings. Most common in Henan is the red bean or Jujube paste, but there are many others with nuts and fruits inside.  (I’m not terribly fond of the paste ones, but a few of the nut versions are pretty good.)  The pastry top will somehow be stamped with a Chinese character of good fortune luck, peace, happiness, etc. They are usually passed around to family, friends, teachers, business colleagues, etc. Visit a Chinese shop before the holiday and for at least two weeks they will be selling these cakes like crazy.  

Image result for chinese moon cake bean

According to legend, the moon cake became a holiday tradition during the Yuan dynasty. China was under the control of Mongolian rulers at the end of the dynasty, and the Ming Chinese were fed up. They decided to stage a revolution, but had a difficult issue in the logistics of communicating their message to the people without tipping off the Mongolians. The story says that the leader Zhu Yuanzhang and his adviser Liu Bowen came up with the brilliant idea of using moon cakes. They started a rumor that a horrific and deadly disease was spreading through the area and that special moon cakes were the only possible cure. Of course the people began buying up moon cakes and hidden inside each moon cake was a message telling them the date and time for the revolution (Mid-Autumn Festival).  The Chinese revolted, the battle was won, and moon cakes became a permanent staple of the holiday! :) 

Image result for chinese woman one the moon

Another famous legend about the festival is that of a tragic romance. In the west, our culture has the beloved Man on the Moon, but in Chinese it’s the beautiful Chang’e, Lady on the Moon.  The story says that centuries ago there live a famous hunter, Hou Yi, and his wife Chang’e. At the time, the world was surrounded by 10 suns and they were burning the earth and its people to death. A brave man, Hou Yi took his bow and arrow and went out to shoot down nine of the suns. He saved the world in the end. As a reward, he was given a special potion that contained immortality. However, because he loved his wife so much and because the potion was only enough for one person, Hou Yi refused to drink it. After this, he was very famous and many people came to learn from him. But some also came to steal from him, including one wicked man. One day while Hou Yi was out, the evil man snuck into the house and attempted to steal the potion from Chang’e. She realized she could not keep him from taking it, and so drank it herself. The potion immediately gave her immortality, and her body flew up, up, up and up to the moon. Heartbroken, Hou Yi came home and prepared a feast on a table under the moon in honor of his wife and in the hopes that she would see his efforts and know how much he missed her. So (according tot the legend), ever since the Chinese like to eat big meals under the moon to remember her sacrifice and to celebrate their own families. 

Gapefruit Oolong Tea

15 Sep

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