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Bar Exam Passage Rates (July 2015 and July 2016)

19 Nov
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July 2016 Results Compared to July 2013

The following Statistics are Comparing July 2016 to July 2015

Alabama (58.4% – down 1.6%)
Alaska (45% – down 15%)
Arizona (53% – down 4%)
Arkansas (Unknown)
California (43% – down 3%)
Colorado (73% – up 1%)
Connecticut (69% – down 6%)
Delaware (66% – Same)
DC (62% – up 18%)
Florida (68.2% – up 6.2%)
Georgia (65.8% – down 2.2%)
Hawaii (Unknown)
Idaho (72.5% – up 4.2%)
Illinois (72% – Fall 0f 4%)
Indiana (61% – down 13%)
Iowa (71% – down 15%)
Kansas (78% – up 3%)
Kentucky (65% – down 6%)
Louisiana (64.9% – up 3.1%)
Maine (Unknown)
Maryland (63% – Same)
Massachusetts (70.8% – down 1%)
Michigan (Unknown)
Minnesota (73.22% – down 4.3%)
Mississippi (Unknown)
Missouri (79.4% – down 4.6%)
Montana (77% – up 15%)
Nebraska (Unknown)
Nevada (51% – down 9%)
New Hampshire (Unknown)
New Jersey (65.35% – down 5.3%)
New Mexico (62% – down 8%)
New York (64% – up 3%)
North Carolina (Unknown, but believed to have dropped)
North Dakota (63% – Fall of 9%)
Ohio (70.4% – down 4%)
Oklahoma (68% – Same)
Oregon (58% – down 2%)
Pennsylvania (69% – down 2%)
Rhode Island (63% – down 1%)
South Carolina (Unknown)
South Dakota (Unknown)
Tennessee (63% – down 1%)
Texas (70.45% – up 4%)
Utah (Unknown)
Vermont (66% – up 13.6%)
Virginia (73% – up 2%)
Washington (70% – down 6%)
West Virginia (71% – up 2%)
Wisconsin (Unknown)
Wyoming (Unknown)

passage-rates-13-14-1

July 2014 Results compared to July 2013

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July 2015 Results Compared to July 2014

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July 2016 Results Compared to July 2015

 

 

Georgia Bar Examination – Reported Students Failed, but they Actually Passed (2015-2016)

9 Sep

Just found this on Georgia’s Bar Examination website.  According to their report, “errors” were made when grading the February 2016 and July 2015 bar examinations.  90 people were told that they had failed, when in fact they actually passed the exam!

OMG! 

I cannot imagine how I would feel if I got a copy of their letter in the mail.  What do you think would outweigh the others? – Anger? Excitement? Annoyance?  Lawsuit-waiting-to-Happen?

Talk about infliction of emotional distress – maybe not intentional, but still. That’s a pretty HUGE error.  Gross Negligence if nothing else.  Their offering is that they will reimburse those people for any expenses they paid for taking the bar again since then.  But what about lost income? Lost time? What about the fees of the screwed-up bar exam?That seems like it’s going a bit under for reimbursement. I fully expect there will be arguments over that, what do y’all think?

Y’all can read the full report here.  But this is the letter they are sending out:

September 6, 2016

The Board of Bar Examiners has determined that you are one of 90 people who passed the Georgia Bar examinations administered in July 2015 or February 2016, despite prior notification that you had failed to pass. As Board members, we take full responsibility for these errors and offer our sincerest apologies to you.

Having taken the Bar examination ourselves, we recognize the distress that this mistake has caused you. As members of the Board, we are charged with upholding the integrity of the Bar examination.

We have conducted a thorough investigation and have confirmed the causes of the errors in the scoring process.  Those have been corrected and we are establishing procedures to ensure we will not make the same errors going forward. Credibility is our certification system’s greatest asset and we must restore the public trust.

The Board is prepared to reimburse you for fees associated with any subsequent exams taken as specified in the letter you have received from the Office of Bar Admissions, although we know your investment of time and effort greatly outweighs the additional cost of the examination.

Again, we offer our most sincere apology.

Sincerely,
John Sammon
Chair, Board of Bar Examiners”

How would you feel about this situation:

A. Relief

B. Fear that it will Happen to Your Score

C. Excitement

D. Anger

E. No Big Deal – It Can Happen to the Best Bar Examiners.

Let me know in the comments below!

GOOD LUCK ON THE BAR EXAM!

25 Jul

Good luck on the Bar Exam to all of you unlucky bar-takers entering the hell that is this test. No, seriously, it isn’t as bad as everyone says! Let me know if you need some prayers, I’ll send some up for you 🙂

If you don’t know an answer on the essays, just SOUND LIKE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT! Say your Bullsh** with emphasis and back it up with strong statements. And at the end, don’t forget to say “Of course, I would never offer legal advice without previously completing thorough research first.”  Keep time, drink coffee, get some sleep, and you know all the usual tips. FIGHTING!  (Or as my Chinese students say before the Gaokao (dread test of all China) – 

Jiayou!

Basically. @thecoveteur:

Bar Exam Statistics

9 May

Visit my website here to compare Statistics from February 2013 through February 2016

  • Alabama (21.5%) – Fall of 21.4% from Feb. 2015
  • Arkansas –Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Colorado (61%) – Fall of 1% from Feb. 2015
  • Connecticut () – Unknown, Statistics not yet Shared.
  • Florida (58.4%) – Rise of 6.4%
  • Hawaii () – Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Idaho (69.9%) – Steady
  • Illinois – Unknown, Statistics not shared.
  • Indiana (51%) ~ Fall of 16% from Feb. 2015
  • Iowa (61%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2016
  • Kansas (50%)Fall of 31.5% from Feb. 2015
  • Kentucky – Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • Louisiana (66.16%) – Rise of 1% from Feb. 2015
  • Maine ~ Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • Maryland (approximately 52.8%) – Rise of 5.8%
  • Massachusetts (50.7%) – Fall of 6% from Feb. 2015
  • Mississippi – Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Missouri (74.3%) – Fall of 3.4% from Feb. 2015
  • Montana (67% including those who have not passed the MPRE, 60% if you don’t include them) – Fall of 7%-14% depending on which number they use from Feb. 2015
  • Nevada (53%) – Fall of 8% from Feb. 2015
  • New Hampshire – Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • New Mexico (69%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2015
  • New York (41%) – Fall of 2% from Feb. 2015
  • North Carolina (26% – if you compare applicant list to passing list) – Fall of 17% from Feb. 2015 unless a bunch of people just haven’t taken the MPRE yet (unlikely, but we’ll hope).
  • Ohio (57.2%) – Fall of 6.6% from February 2015
  • Oklahoma (69%) – Rise of 2% from Feb. 2015
  • Oregon (60%) – Fall of 4% from Feb. 2015.
  • Pennsylvania (56.3%) – Rise of 5.7% from Feb. 2015
  • South Carolina (56.18%) – Fall of 7.27% from Feb. 2016
  • Tennessee (51%) – Fall of 3% from Feb. 2015
  • Texas () – Total Unknown.
  • Vermont (61.3%) – Rise of 15.6% from Feb. 2016
  • Viriginia (57.64%) – Fall of 1.5% from Feb. 2016
  • Washington (58.5%) – Fall of 7.2% from Feb. 2015
  • Washington, DC (44%) – Rise of 5%
  • West Virginia (50.4%) – Fall of 17.7% from Feb. 2015

Bar Statistics Continued (Again :) )

30 Apr

Visit my website here to compare Statistics from February 2013 through February 2016

  • Alabama (21.5%) – Fall of 21.4% from Feb. 2015
  • Arkansas –Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Florida (58.4%) – Rise of 6.4%
  • Idaho (69.9%) – Steady
  • Illinois – Unknown, Statistics not shared.
  • Indiana (51%) ~ Fall of 16% from Feb. 2015
  • Iowa (61%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2016
  • Kansas (50%)Fall of 31.5% from Feb. 2015
  • Kentucky – Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • Louisiana (66.16%) – Rise of 1% from Feb. 2015
  • Maine ~ Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • Massachusetts (50.7%) – Fall of 6% from Feb. 2015
  • Mississippi – Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Missouri (74.3%) – Fall of 3.4% from Feb. 2015
  • Montana (67% including those who have not passed the MPRE, 60% if you don’t include them) – Fall of 7%-14% depending on which number they use from Feb. 2015
  • New Hampshire – Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • New Mexico (69%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2015
  • New York (41%) – Fall of 2% from Feb. 2015
  • North Carolina (26% – if you compare applicant list to passing list) – Fall of 17% from Feb. 2015 unless a bunch of people just haven’t taken the MPRE yet (unlikely, but we’ll hope).
  • Ohio (57.2%) – Fall of 6.6% from February 2015
  • Oklahoma (69%) – Rise of 2% from Feb. 2015
  • Oregon (60%) – Fall of 4% from Feb. 2015.
  • Pennsylvania (56.3%) – Rise of 5.7% from Feb. 2015
  • South Carolina (56.18%) – Fall of 7.27% from Feb. 2016
  • Tennessee (51%) – Fall of 3% from Feb. 2015
  • Vermont (61.3%) – Rise of 15.6% from Feb. 2016
  • Washington (58.5%) – Fall of 7.2% from Feb. 2015
  • West Virginia (50.4%) – Fall of 17.7% from Feb. 2015
  • Viriginia (57.64%) – Fall of 1.5% from Feb. 2016

Bar Exam Statistics Continued

22 Apr

Visit my website here to compare Statistics from February 2013 through February 2016

  • Arkansas –Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Florida (58.4%) – Rise of 6.4%
  • Idaho (69.9%) – Steady
  • Illinois – Unknown, Statistics not shared.
  • Indiana (51%) ~ Fall of 16% from Feb. 2015
  • Iowa (61%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2016
  • Kansas (50%)Fall of 31.5% from Feb. 2015
  • Kentucky – Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • Mississippi – Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Missouri (74.3%) – Fall of 3.4% from Feb. 2015
  • Montana (67% including those who have not passed the MPRE, 60% if you don’t include them) – Fall of 7%-14% depending on which number they use from Feb. 2015
  • New Mexico (69%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2015
  • North Carolina (26% – if you compare applicant list to passing list) – Fall of 17% from Feb. 2015 unless a bunch of people just haven’t taken the MPRE yet (unlikely, but we’ll hope).
  • Ohio (57.2%) – Fall of 6.6% from February 2015
  • Oklahoma (69%) – Rise of 2% from Feb. 2015
  • Oregon (60%) – Fall of 4% from Feb. 2015.
  • Pennsylvania (56.3%) – Rise of 5.7% from Feb. 2015
  • South Carolina (56.18%) – Fall of 7.27% from Feb. 2016
  • Tennessee (51%) – Fall of 3% from Feb. 2015
  • Vermont (61.3%) – Rise of 15.6% from Feb. 2016
  • Washington (58.5%) – Fall of 7.2% from Feb. 2015
  • West Virginia (50.4%) – Fall of 17.7% from Feb. 2015
  • Viriginia (57.64%) – Fall of 1.5% from Feb. 2016

Bar Exam Statistics Continued

16 Apr

Visit my website here to compare Statistics from February 2013 through February 2016

  • Arkansas –Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Idaho (69.9%) – Steady
  • Illinois – Unknown, Statistics not shared.
  • Indiana (51%) ~ Fall of 16% from Feb. 2015
  • Kansas (50%)Fall of 31.5% from Feb. 2015
  • Kentucky – Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • Missouri (74.3%) – Fall of 3.4% from Feb. 2015
  • Montana (67% including those who have not passed the MPRE, 60% if you don’t include them) – Fall of 7%-14% depending on which number they use from Feb. 2015
  • New Mexico (69%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2015
  • North Carolina (26% – if you compare applicant list to passing list) – Fall of 17% from Feb. 2015 unless a bunch of people just haven’t taken the MPRE yet (unlikely, but we’ll hope).
  • Oklahoma (69%) – Rise of 2% from Feb. 2015
  • Oregon (60%) – Fall of 4% from Feb. 2015.
  • Pennsylvania (56.3%) – Rise of 5.7% from Feb. 2015
  • Tennessee (51%) – Fall of 3% from Feb. 2015
  • Vermont (61.3%) – Rose of 15.6%
  • Washington (58.5%) – Fall of 7.2% from Feb. 2015
  • West Virginia (50.4%) – Fall of 17.7% from Feb. 2015

Bar Exam Statistic’s Continue

10 Apr

Visit my website here to compare Statistics from February 2013 through February 2016

  • Arkansas –Unknown, Statistics not Shared.
  • Illinois – Unknown, Statistics not shared.
  • Indiana ~ Stats not yet Posted
  • Kansas (50%)Fall of 31.5% from Feb. 2015
  • Kentucky – Unknown, Statistics not yet shared.
  • Montana (67% including those who have not passed the MPRE, 60% if you don’t include them) – Fall of 7%-14% depending on which number they use from Feb. 2015
  • New Mexico (69%) – Fall of 11% from Feb. 2015
  • North Carolina (26% – if you compare applicant list to passing list) – Fall of 17% from Feb. 2015 unless a bunch of people just haven’t taken the MPRE yet (unlikely, but we’ll hope).
  • Oklahoma (69%) – Steady
  • Oregon (60%) – Fall of 4% from Feb. 2015.
  • Pennsylvania (56.3%) – Rise of 5.7% from Feb. 2015
  • Tennessee (51%) – Fall of 3% from Feb. 2015
  • Washington (58.5%) – Fall of 7.2% from Feb. 2015
  • West Virginia (50.4%) – Fall of 17.7% from Feb. 2015

Bar Statistics Start to Fall Again in 2016 (Week 1)

2 Apr

Bar Results are starting to come out and some of the passing rates seem to be falling again!

  • North Carolina (26% – if you compare applicant list to passing list) – Fall of 17% from Feb. 2015 unless a bunch of people just haven’t taken the MPRE yet (unlikely, but we’ll hope).
  • Oklahoma (69%) – Steady
  • Kansas (50%) – Fall of 31.5% from Feb. 2015
  • Illinois – Unknown, Statistics not shared.
  • West Virginia (50.4%) – Fall of 17.7%

Bar Exam Tip #2

30 Jan

When you get to the Multiple Choice Questions, always follow this method:

  1. Read the Answers first and mark off those you know are legally incorrect or that don’t make sense.

  2. Read the Question second and mark off any more wrong answers you notice here (i.e. answers that are true facts but that don’t actually answer the question).

  3. Finally read the Facts.  

Why do this?

Historically, this is the easiest, fastest, and most accurate way to solve any Multiple Choice question. I recomend it to students taking the LSAT, TESOL, IELTS, GRE, GMAT and other exams as well.

There are many reasons for doing the first step at the beginning.

  1. You avoid some of the test traps. Test questions often play mind games. For example: they give you opposite answers, they alter the time limits for a statute of limitations, they add an exception, they change one word. And the facts will point to the wrong conclusion. Don’t let them get to you; You’ve studied the law. Just go with what you remember from your studies and take out any answers you know are legally incorrect before letting the facts distract you.
  2. You avoid the dreaded moment where you think you have the answer and then it isn’t on the list. Your mind blocks up, you can’t get that first solution out of your head, and you bomb it. Know the possibilities, the real possibilities, and read the question to figure out which one fits.
  3. You can now easily ignore any irrelevant facts or details (also a reason for doing steps three and four next) in the fact pattern itself and move more quickly to the relevant information.  These questions often through in irrelevant information and ask you to sort through it to figure out what was important. Knowing the answers helps you move through the question quickly. If all the answers are about whether or not the person is guilty because the crime was in private property, you know to ignore the fact that the suspect gave different answers about their age.  

The second step mainly keeps you from falling into the mistake of getting lost in the facts and failing to answer the right question. Fact Patterns can actually depict a couple of legal issues, while only one is relevant for the question. Nonetheless, one of the answers will solve or be related to that irrelevant legal problem trying to trick you. Often, that “correct but wrong” answer is higher than the right one on the list because we will instinctively go with the first “correct” answer we see. But that is not our job on the test. We are not required to solve all the legal errors, we are asked to answer the question given.  So to avoid falling for the red herring (correct, but not the right response, answers), do step two to erase all possible distractors that fail to solve the question.

I’d say for about 1/4-1/3 of the test, these first two steps will actually lead you to only one remaining answer. 

For the rest of the test, you’ll need to pick between 2 (sometiems 3 on a tough question) remaining solutions.  But at least you have narrowed your options down and the odds are better!

 

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