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#CherryBlossoms of #Sapporo

29 Apr

Finally got to see the cherry blossom of Japan – bucket list wish accomplished!

#Sapporo #Japan Night life!

29 Apr

At #Sapporo Tv Tower waiting for #night to set in! Was a beautiful #sunset – now to see one of the ‘#Top3 Best night views in #Japan’

#KPOP sighting! ~ Target was flying fron ICN to Japan!

27 Apr

Excitement!

The new #KPOP band #Target were flying with us today to #Japan! We Checked in right beside them and then flew out on the same flight.

I hadn’t heard of them yet, but the Fan girls were out on force and brought me up to date 😀 4th KPOP band I’ve seen on my travels!

Awesomeness!

#music #koreanmusic #pop #kpopband #instakpop #koreanpop #music #band

#LaborDay and #SpringBreak ~ Off to #Japan!

26 Apr

Off on sping break for the Labor Day Holiday! Got a Five day break so I’m headed to Japan! Haven’t been there since 2013 so I’m super psyched! 😃

#Travel to #Kyoto – I went out walking one morning in spring 🎼

6 Feb

‘By the river I went walking
When my troubles came to mind.
But I did not stop for them
And they could not catch up to me.’

This is the breath-taking park at #Arashiyama in #Kyoto Japan. My friends went to find the #monkey 🙈🙉🙊park at the top of the mountain, but I’m not a HUGE fan of monkeys up close – and – personal. So I just walked along the river. This day is one of my most precious memories. The atmosphere just soothes your soul ❤️.

#Art – Cherry Blossoms

2 Feb

Art in the temple & gardens of Sanjusangendo & Chishaku-in at the beautiful #Kyoto. Facebook reminded me of this trip in my memories today. I still say, if you could only visit one city in all of #Japan, go to Kyoto. Breathtaking history, culture, art, museums, temples, natures, modern. . . . I ❤️ Kyoto as much as I do Seoul (and that’s saying a lot!)

Inappropriate #Art

1 Feb

This was right in front of me at a clothing store. At First, I thought it was a #flower. . . ‘Oh, cute’. Then realized. . . . no those are panties. This is a statue of looking up a woman’s skirt. Exactly what the kids and teenagers walking around need to see in life! It wasn’t even an underwear store!!!

Hiragana

28 Oct

Japanese has three separate writing systems – Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji. Their usage depends largely on the origin of the word. Kanji are the Sino-Japanese words that descend from China and use the simplified Chinese characters. Katakana incorporates many other foreign words, and not just English words! Then Hiragana is the predominant written form for everything else. Hiragana is by far the most common written form, although both Katakana and Kanji will be intermixed in most sentences.  So Hiragana is the first one usually taught to new Japanese students. Thankfully, it is easier to write and remember than the Kanji, having been simplified a lot time ago. So although it might take some time to memorize this many characters, it shouldn’t be too hard to learn!

Hiragana is read phonetically, and most of the letters can be replicated in English. Each “character” represents a sound, with all but one (‘ん’ ‘N’) including a vowel sound. There are 71 separate sounds but only 46 characters in total – one single consonant, five vowels, and forty combination sounds. 

PRONUNCIATION RULES

  1. ( ゛) = Dakuten, put on the top right of the character. Shows that a character is changing from unvoiced (き is ki) to voiced (ぎ is gi) 
  2. は (ha) is said as (wa) when it comes by itself or is after the topic of the sentence. For example, watashi wa (I am) is spelled 私は.
  3. The characters や (ya), よ (yo), and ゆ (yu) can be added to a character that ends in the (i) sound. If so, the (i) is silent. For example, if ぎ (gi) is added to や (ya), it will be pronounced as ぎや (gya).

  4. Doubled vowels (as in おにいさん | oni’isan | big brother) are demonstrated by adding an extra vowel. に (Ni) is lengthened by adding the extra い (i) to form ni’i.  For the doubled vowel (o), either う or お might be added – it depends on the word.

  5. Doubled consonants (as in にっぽん | Nippon) are created by adding a ‘small’ (Tsu) or っ right before the consonant. It is actually smaller in size than the character Tsu (つっ – see the difference).  You don’t actually pronounce the small Tsu. For example, in Japanese, ‘begging’ would be written ‘beっging.’

  6. The only exception are the doubled -n characters (na, ni, no, nu, ne). They are doubled by adding ん (an extra n) before the n.

  7. On the other hand っ (‘small tsu) can also be added at the end of a word to suggest stronger emotions. Rather like a !.  However, when they do that, it seems to often suggest stronger emotions that are not quite strong enough for a (!).  For example, if I’m talking to a child, “you’re so silly っ” might be used versus “you’re such an idiot!” to someone who just caused a lot of trouble by doing something stupid. In that case, it is also no pronounced.

  8. If the vowels (i) and (u) are in between (k), (s), (t), (p), (h) or if the come after one of those at the end of a sentence, then the (i) or (u) may be silent.  For example, ですね (desu ne) is often said (des ne). 
  9. If へ (he) comes after a location, the (h) is silent and it says (e).

  10. The Japanese (r) is similar to that of China and Korea. Put your tongue in the (L) position but say (R).  If you listen, it comes out a little differently from the English (r) sound. 

CHARACTERS

あ (a) え (e) い (i) お (o) う (u)
だ (da) で (de) ぢ (ji) ど (do) づ (zu)
た (ta) て (te) ち (chi) と (to) つ (tsu)
が (ga) げ (ge) ぎ (gi) ご (go) ぐ (gu)
は (ha) へ (he) ひ (hi) ほ (ho) ふ (fu)
ば (ba) べ (be) び (bi) ぼ (bo) ぶ (bu)
ぱ (pa) ぺ (pe) ぴ (pi) ぽ (po) ぺ (pu)
か (ka) け (ke) き (ki) こ (ko) く (ku)
ま (ma) め (me) み (mi) も (mo) む (mu)
ん (n)
な (na) ね (ne) に (ni) の (no) ぬ (nu)
ら (ra) れ (re) り (ri) ろ (ro) る (ru)
さ (sa) せ (se) し (shi) そ (so) す (su)
ざ (za) ぜ (ze) じ (ji) ぞ (zo) ず (zu)
わ (wa) を (wo)
や (ya) よ (yo) ゆ (yu)

-Y COMBOS

 Note the lack of a (y) in the sh-, ch-, and j- combos.

びゃ (bya) びょ (byo) びゅ (byu)
ぴゃ (pya) ぴょ (pyo) ぴゅ (pyu)
ひゃ (hya) ひょ (hyo) ひゅ (hyu)
ぎゃ (gya) ぎょ (gyo) ぎゅ (gyu)
きゃ (kya) きょ (kyo) きゅ (kyu)
にゃ (nya) にょ (nyo) にゅ (nyu)
みゃ (mya) みょ (myo) みゅ (myu)
りゃ (rya) りょ (ryo) りゅ (ryu)
しゃ (sha) しょ (sho) しゅ (shu)
じゃ (ja) じょ (jo) じゅ (ju)
ちゃ (cha) ちょ (cho) ちゅ (chu)

“Take in long-lost, wartime art attributed to Chihiro”

7 Oct

“Take in long-lost, wartime art attributed to Chihiro”

by “The Japan News

The Yomiuri ShimbunThree long-lost paintings believed to have been produced by the popular picture book author Chihiro Iwasaki (1918-1974) are on display at her namesake museum in Tokyo.The works were discovered last year at the Nippon seinenkan (foundation of Japan-youth center) in Tokyo. One of the three works is making its public debut at the ongoing exhibition, titled “Commemorating 70 Years of Non-war — Chihiro’s Wish for Peace,” at the Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo in Nerima Ward.

The discovery was significant because many of the artist’s works created before and during World War II were lost in air raids.

“We want people to think about the war through Chihiro’s works, which were produced at a time when people were not allowed to freely create art,” said a museum official. . . . .

READ MORE

The Bowls of the Seas ~ Aquarium Seas that is

15 Jun
DSC02747

Osaka Aquarium

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