Tag Archives: tourism

#China #Waterscape of Tongli

10 Apr

Some ancient #bridges on the waterways of #Tongli in Southern #China.

Drinks Around! #Alcohol and South #Korea

10 Feb

Glass of wine anyone? 🍷

Thought I’d drop a small Warning about alcohol for Visitors to #Korea during the #Olympics or well, visiting ever. 😀

Don’t get me wrong, the alcohol in Korea is good. But like #Baijiu in #China – you gotta be careful. One really famous Korean #drink is #Soju (소주) which usually ranges between 20% to 40% alcohol, but can be as much as 50%. 😱 VERY strong. You drink it in shot glasses and moderate the intake. The first time I visited #Seoul, two boys in our group drank it like Beer and were deathly ill the next day (and they weren’t lightweights). It’s fun and a great #Cultural experience, but be warned 😋

If you want a Good drink, but prefer something less likely to sterilize your insides, I recommend one of Korea’s Plum Wines. They are sweet and great to sip & enjoy! 🍾

Tip #1- Asian Culture (Including both #China and #Korea in my experience) is often built around the idea that an empty cup or plate is a sign the host did not provide enough. So if you don’t want them to keep pouring you more alcohol later, leave a medium bit in your glass. They are less likely to add to it. If your glass is mostly empty, thery are inclined to fill it back up.

Tip #2 – The more you drink at the beginning of the night, the more they’ll assume you can hold your alcohol and start encouraging you to drink even more through toasts. If you’re moderating, drink less early in the night. They won’t pressure you as much later.

Tip #3 – A lot of culture guides say you cannot refuse alcohol in cultures like this because it is ‘rude.’ That’s not true. In my experience in Korea, they were always understanding if I said I wasn’t drinking tonight. They usually just assume it’s for religious or health reasons and move on. Though it’s easier for women to avoid than for men.

If you are gonna party hearty, drink responsibly! Bring a friend who can make sure you A) get home, B) don’t accidently get in a fight or trouble, and C) don’t accidently offend the locals around you. 😀

Translation in #Asia – Miscommunication Much?

8 Feb

This is why living in #China or translating from Chinese – English is so hard. . . . Apparently this was supposed to say ‘Copy Business Hours’. Instead it says ‘Check toilet’ 😂😜 Most translators are like this! Even #Google translate sucks with Asian languages 😭 *For anyone visiting #China I recommend #HanpingLite. It’s a great dictionary. If you’re in #Korea to visit or for the #olympics, I recommend #codegent Korean Lite app. 😀

That’s Awesome! #China Disabled Persons Performing Art Troupe. Really Cool!

29 Jan

 

 

“China Disabled People’s Performing Arts Troupe”

by Erisa Apantaku via Jetli

“In the autumn of 1987, a group of thirty disabled people performed in front of crowds at the first China Art Festival in Beijing. BAM! The China Disabled People’s Performing Arts Troupe was born. Thirty years later, the troupe is thriving, having performed for thousands of people in over sixty countries, except for Antarctica.

Headed by president, art director, and main actor Tai Lihua, who became deaf at the age of two. This did not stop her from pursuing her passion of dance, the troupe recently concluded a tour in Germany.

Everyone in the organization has some form of disability, be it auditory, physical, or visual impairment. Visually impaired musicians read the music in braille. Hearing impaired dancers use vibrations to feel the beat. Visually impaired dancers use ropes to learn movements together and even implement white canes and guide dogs into performances like “To See Spring.”

china UNESCO goodwill dancers Performing Arts

Although the scope of the China Disabled People’s Performing Arts Troupe has expanded greatly from the humble beginnings as an amateur organization to an internationally acclaimed professional group. The troupe has retained its same founding ideals throughout the three decades of its existence:

“self-respect, self-confidence, self-improvement and self-reliance, as well as mutual respect, mutual care, mutual aid and mutual complementarities.”

These guiding principles have allowed the China Disabled People’s Performing Arts Troupe to connect with audiences from diverse backgrounds around the globe. Their performances have attracted the positive words of leaders from Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Asia, and the Americas.

READ MORE

What Would Your Lock Say?

29 Jan
InkedDSC03283_LI

Locks from N Seoul Tower

Breakfast at #Seoul

28 Dec

​One of my #Korea favorites! #Peach Iced #tea at the Paris Baguette. With a delicious ham & cheese muffin. . . . Great start to a Great day!

#Christmas Ride!

24 Dec

​Awwwww  #Santa picked me up yesterday for a ride on his way to deliver #toys!  ❤️💖 Wasn’t he sweet!  Although his reindeer have upgraded to being disguised a lot like a #Toyota. 😆 Thanks to #Didi for the opportunity to be sleigh escorted to my #Christmas #party!

China #Book Art

19 Dec

​Awwwww, my #student got me this beautiful bookmark for #Christmas. It looks like the Traditional Chinese cut-out #art – with #bamboo leaves and simple window pane style. Love it!

Travel #Foodie – Funny Fruit

12 Sep


Breakfaat at the hotel in #southkorea – I think it’s a kind of #lychee? Maybe? It looks all pokey and fuzzy 😜 I like the Color combination!

The Past Renewed

29 Aug
Bamboo

Unhyeongung Palace (Seoul, Korea)

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