Tag Archives: Language

#Didi Adventures!

1 Oct

Gave the poor Didi driver (Uber’s alternative) a heart attack today. Guy and his wife/girlfriend picked me up. Took us forever to coordinate the pick-up spot. I could here him ranting about “xxxxx Didi xxxx waijiao xxxx Didi.” Looked at my phone and realized it was only their 2nd time being Didi drivers. 0_0 And they got the crazy foreigner LOLOLOL Poor dude. My mind was running the conversation through to something like “this is just my luck! Why, we just did it, and we got the foreigner! Why me!?!” I didn’t know how to tell him it’s his luck because it’s my luck. I was only taking Didi because I left my jacket at the store and this was my second trip of the day ūüėõ -_-

He got so turned around he drove past my street, figured out that construction has blocked off all streets for the next 2 miles, had to turn around and go back. Couldn’t find the road. . . . . Girlfriend is hysterically laughing at him while trying to explain she knew only a “little English. English – – – think too difficult.” Had me laughing too. I think he wanted to kill us both by the time the trip was over. Sweet heart that he was, he did try to carry my waters home for me though.

Gave them good stars ūüôā ‚̧

Not Quite What I expected. . .

31 Jul

Adventures in #Translation!
Tried ordering an iced tea and cola. Pointed to iced tea picture . . . waited then said ‘Bing #Cola’ (Iced Cola). She looks at me funny, but says ‘ok!’ Hands me a cola in the tea glass. ūüėúūüėú Had to go back and get the tea – too funny!

#Business Vocabulary ~ #Economies of Scope and Scale

27 May

As always, this lesson is not intended to be professional advice. This is simply lesson material for ESL students in Business, Economics, and Finance classes. Posted here for their use or for helping other students.

Unlike Short-Term (Áü≠śúü)¬†Planning, Long-Term (ťēŅśúü) operates on different goals (Áõģś†á), strategies (śąėÁē•), and analyses (ŚąÜśěź). ¬†

Business.jpg

Two common goals are very important: Economies of Scale and Economies of Scope. Continue reading

Chinese 101 ~ I Love You!

10 May

I (śąĎ) Love (ÁąĪ) You (šĹ†) =¬†W«í √†i n«ź =¬†śąĎÁąĪšĹ†

I Love You

Writing Hangul -„ĄĻ

1 Dec

‚ÄúR / L‚ÄĚ („ĄĻ)
3 STROKES 

First ‚Äď Start on the top left and make a¬†long horizontal line. Then (WITHOUT PICKING UP YOUR PEN!) pull a short vertical line down. ¬†Basically, you are forming the “Hangul G.” You see this a lot in Hangul, where on character is used to form another.¬†g1

Second ‚Äď Starting on the left, form a long horizontal line that connects to the first stroke. ¬†You are kind of making a backwards, upside down ¬†„Ą∑. ūüôā¬†

R2.png

Third.¬†Starting on the top left of stroke two, go down forming a short vertical line. Then (WITHOUT PICKING UP YOUR PEN!) make a second long horizontal line. ¬†Basically makes a Hangul ‚ÄúN‚ÄĚ.¬†

n4

FINAL

R3.png

r1

EXAMPLES (FROM TOP 6000TOPIK WORDS)

  • žöįŽ¶¨ (Uli) =¬†We / Our
  • Ž™®Ž•īŽč§ (Moleuda) =¬†To not know
  • Ž¨ľ (Mul) =¬†Water

Writing Hiragana ‚Äď „Āą

30 Nov

‚ÄúE‚ÄĚ OR ‚Äú„Āą‚ÄĚ SAYS ‚Äúshort e sound as in egg‚ÄĚ
2 STROKES 

The First stroke belongs in the upper middle of the character. Starting on the left, make a very small sloped line downwards. 

eh-1

Sometimes, you might see this line with a small side-stroke back towards the left. These characters were originally written with a brush, and this was just a small pull sideways¬†that gave it flair. It shouldn‚Äôt be too deliberate ‚Äď more a fast pull than anything.

eh-2

Second, below the first line and¬†without picking up your pen! Start by making a sloping-upwards line. Then pull your pen down quickly in a slight diagonal.¬†Drag it back up again about 1/2 way. Then pull off into a sloping “s” shape.

Kind of like a slanted “h” with a fancy top and a hooked end.¬†

eh-3

Pay attention to proportions Рnote that Step 2 ends up close to where Step 1 started. Step 3 pulls off at close to where Step 1 started.  The hook on Step 4 goes below Step 2. 

Eh 7.png

Final Version of This Part: 
eh-4

FINAL

EXAMPLES (FROM TOP 1000 JAPANESE WORDS)

  • „Āč„Āą„āč (Kaeru) =¬†Frog
  • „ĀĄ„Āą (Ie) =¬†House / Home
  • „Āą„āď„Āī„Ā§ (Enpitsu) =¬†Pencil

Writing Hangul -„Ą∑

29 Nov

‚ÄúD/T‚ÄĚ („Ą∑)
2 STROKES 

First РStart on the top left and make a long horizontal line. 

g-1

Second –¬†Starting on the top left of your line, go down forming a short vertical line. Then (without picking up your pen) make a second long horizontal line. ¬†Basically makes a Hangul “N”. You see this a lot in Hangul – one character being used to form another.

n4

FINAL

d1

d2

 

EXAMPLES (FROM TOP 6000 TOPIK WORDS)

  • žč∂Žč§ (Sipda) =¬†To Want / To Hope
  • ŽāėŽč§ (Nada) =¬†To be Born
  • ŽĆÄŪÜĶŽ†Ļ (Daetongryeong) =¬†The President

Writing Hangul – „Ąī

27 Nov

“N” („Ąī)
1 STROKE (DON’T PICK UP YOUR PEN AT ALL)

Start on the top left and make a short vertical line, then bring your pen right to make the longer horizontal line .

n4

FINAL

n1

EXAMPLES (FROM TOP 6000 TOPIK WORDS)

  • žõź(Weon) =¬†KRW (Korean Money)
  • žĚłÍįĄ (Ingan) = Human Being
  • Žąą (Nun) =¬†Eyes

Writing Hiragana – „ĀĄ

26 Nov

‚ÄúI‚ÄĚ OR ‚Äú„ĀĄ‚ÄĚ SAYS ‚ÄúEE‚ÄĚ
2 STROKES 

The first stroke looks a little like a fish hook (but not quite written that way). Make a slightly curved vertical line down, then (without picking up your pen) give it a small up-stroke. These characters were originally written with a brush, and this was just a small pull upwards that gave it flair. It shouldn’t be too deliberate – more a fast pull than anything.

i1

Second, on the right – make a vertical line downwards slightly curved to the left.

i2FINAL

i3

EXAMPLES (FROM TOP 1000 JAPANESE WORDS)

  • „Āó„Āč„ĀĄ (Shikai) =¬†Dentist
  • „Āõ„āď„Āõ„ĀĄ¬†(Sensei) =¬†Teacher
  • „ĀĄ (i) =¬†Stomach

Hangul Pronunciation

14 Nov

HANGUL PRONUNCIATION CHEAT SHEET ($1)

hangul-product

Clearly Organized

Explanatory

Infographic-based PDF

Outlines the Hangul Pronunciation Rules (including Batchim, Double Consonants, Double Vowels, and more).  Everything carefully designed to include examples, pattern-building organization of letters, and other tricks intended to help you see how the language is built into the blocks.

Also Includes a simple cheat sheet on the Hangul (Korean) Pronunciation rules. If you want to learn more, this cheat sheet is perfect for you.  

Includes

  • specific pronunciation rules for each letter, dipthong, and combination
  • how to pronounce¬†and differentiate difficult letters and sounds
  • the difference between the normal, aspirated, and tense letters that confuse so many learners.
  • the rules for double consonants
  • Re-syllabification, Consonant Assimilation, Tensification, and more.

All rules are simplified and stated clearly to ease understanding. Each rule or instruction includes Korean and Romanized examples for you to use as a starting point. 

Although Korean letters look simple when you first start, it soon becomes obvious that correct pronunciation can be very complex.  However, if you follow this cheat sheet, you should start to master it very soon!

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