Tag Archives: International Business

Queen of Problem Solving!

14 Sep

You know that Job interview question “What is one time you faced a difficult situation and how did you resolve or handle the situation?” I like that question, because let me count the ways!

Just spent a week working with a US partner, the US partner’s supplier, the supplier’s International division, the US supplier again, their superior, and their superior’s superior — they concluded we couldn’t do what needed to be done.

After reviewing the online system capabilities, I found a way and instead we have successfully set up a program to run the system out of both US and China. It just took 10 minutes to adapt, and voila! We are up and running!

If nothing else, working internationally gives you a lot of experience in handling difficult situations and in finding innovative solutions. Sometimes you have to patchwork things together with duct tape and glue to get it operating, but success is always possible — somehow, somewhere. You just have to be open-minded enough to try many solutions until you find the right one.

#Exports – Look Don’t Touch

23 Apr

#Mercantilism at its worst 😂😂😂 No buying #exports here!!! ONLY #IMPORTS ALLOWED!

*Mercantilism is the belief that you should encourage exporting and limit imports’ – I just taught it in class the other day 😉

#Fructis – an #International Brand

8 Jun

International Business at its best! We’ve got English, Russian, German/Dutch, Spanish, Italian. . . But sadly for a Chinese website, no #Chinese! 

#Business in #China ~ #Contracts

4 Jun

One of the problems I repeatedly encounter in China is the fact that they view contracts as “guidelines rather than actual rules.” The American business system and legal system interprets a contract as law — If you agreed to it, you MUST do it. The Chinese professionals I have worked with interpret contracts as “this is what we think might work, but it’s always open to reinterpretation and change later.” One year I was actually told (after completing all of the required work) “Oh, well, what we said was really just too excessive so we’ve decided not to pay you that.”

This is a VERY big problem and a huge source of discord between the Chinese and foreign workers. Americans are expecting things by the book, but in China you need adaptability. On the other hand, the Chinese are promising more than they deliver and breaking promises. If you are considering working in an American-Chinese business or teaching atmosphere, I highly recommend you discuss this issue before signing contracts. Talk to the other side and verify how they view a contract — law or general guideline. Find a way to agree on what will be included and then keep the promises you do agree to.

Important #Business Symbols ~ Asian #Currencies

15 May

As always, this lesson is not intended to be professional advice. This is simply lesson material for ESL students in Business, Economics, and Finance classes. Posted here for their use or for helping other students.

Here are some helpful Business Symbols (标志) you should be familiar with for Business English! Although there are some more common than these, you should memorize these symbols because they are the currencies for Asia.

Currencies

Bangladesh (孟加拉国) Taka (BDT)
Nu Bhutan (不丹) Ngultrum (BTN)
Cambodia (柬埔寨) Riel (KHR)
¥ China (中国) Yuan or Renminbi (CNY)
¥ Japan (日本) Yen (JPY)
India (印度) Rupee (INR)
Rp Indonesia (印度尼西亚) Rupiah (IDR)
Laos (老挝) Kip (LAK)
RM Malaysia (马来西亚) Ringgit (RM)
Rf Maldives (马尔代夫) Rufiyaa (MVR)
Mongolia (蒙古) Tögrög (MNT)
K Myanmar (缅甸) Kyat (BMK)
रू Nepal (尼泊尔) Rupee (NPR)
Philippines (菲律宾) Peso (PHP)
Russia (俄国) Ruble (RUB)
South Korea (韩国) Won (KRW)
 රු Sri Lanka (斯里兰卡) Rupee (LKR)
NT$ Taiwan (台湾) New Dollar (TWD)
฿ Thailand (泰国) Baht (THB)
Vietnam (越南) Dong (VND)
%d bloggers like this: