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Coco Chanel the Nazi Spy

16 Dec

“Coco Chanel the Nazi spy: New document reveals that fashion designer worked for Hitler’s military intelligence”

by John Hall via “Daily Mail Online

French researchers claim to have found indisputable evidence that Coco Chanel worked as a spy for the Nazis during the Second World War.

A written record made public for the first time in a documentary broadcast on French television last night is said to prove that the late fashion designer was a member of Abwehr – Adolf Hitler’s secret military intelligence agency.

The documentary also raised questions about the role played by other French celebrities during the Second World War, including singers Edith Piaf and Maurice Chevalier and dramatist Sacha Guitry.

Claim: A document made public for the first time in a documentary broadcast on French television last night is said to prove that Coco Chanel was a member of Abwehr - Adolf Hitler's secret military intelligence agency

Claim: A document made public for the first time in a documentary broadcast on French television last night is said to prove that Coco Chanel was a member of Abwehr – Adolf Hitler’s secret military intelligence agency

The newly revealed document suggests that while working for the Nazis, Coco Chanel (pictured left and right) went by the codename ‘Westminster’ – a reference to her affair with the Duke of Westminster in the 1920s

L’Ombre d’un Doute [The Shadow of a Doubt], broadcast on the state-owned France 3 channel yesterday evening, countered the French government’s official claim that almost every well-known figure from the time either joined the Resistance movement or simply boycotted the Nazis.

Although the claim has long been considered spurious by French historians, the issue of doubt has largely been ignored by mainstream French broadcasters. . . .

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Rose Petals Shower the Statue of Liberty

8 Jun

In honor of D-Day and the veterans who could not make it to France for the memorial events, France was gracious enough to send helicopters over a memorial at the US Statue of Liberty. The helicopters poured out one million rose petals.  What an amazing gesture!

Saving 10,000: Operation Kindertransport

21 Nov

Most people have forgotten about it, if they ever even knew in the first place.  They called it Operation Kindertransport–the mission that to save endangered children.  At the time it began, Hitler already ruled Germany and Austria; the holocaust was in its beginning stages.  Then Kristallnacht (the Night of Broken Glass) saw Nazi forces implementing a series of programs against Jewish families resulting in the death of 91 and the arrest and assignment to concentration camps for 30,000 others.  Suddenly, those watching knew that things were about to get a lot worse.  

 

Five days later, several concerned Jewish and Quaker UK citizens went to the British government asking for help in a rescue mission  they were planning to help children most at risk. The original idea was to collect children or teens in danger of arrest, orphans, and children whose parents were imprisoned.  The UK would then house and Continue reading

US & Canadian laws have been D***S to Chinese Immigrants

16 Nov

I’d like to start by stating that US and Canadian laws have been ashamedly horrible to Chinese immigrants. Yep, and that’s really Horrible with all caps, lots of exclamation points, and a few “WTFs” thrown in.   I mean seriously. . . I’ve never read such racially loaded piles of SH**.  I mean, the legislative discussion behind these laws covers everything from racism to victim blaming to sexism to placing them at the bottom of the freaking “Caste” system. I mean, when have we ever even had a caste system!   Here are some of the key descriptions of the Chinese used in excusing such terrible racist legal movements:

  • “Culturally inferior”
  • “Racially unfit”
  • “Of the lowest orders”
  • “Or the lowest castes”
  • “Virtually Pariahs”
  • The “Dregs of the population”
  • “Lepers”
  • “Slaves”
  • “Yellow faces”

The list goes on.  They even mention that, of the Chinese women in the US in the late 1800s (after the Civil War was fought), most were “in a state of servitude, beside which African slavery was a beneficent captivity.” They talk about how many of these women were being forced into sexual slavery, but promptly use that as a reason to banish the population as a whole from American shores! Canada, with no just cause outside of racism, even taxed every Chinese immigrant $500 throughout the early 1900s, took away many of their rights (include the right to vote, own property, own a business, etc.) and eventually outlawed Chinese immigration almost completely (only 15 immigrants from China were allowed in from 1924 to 1944).  This continued even when Chinese-heritage soldiers rose up to fight with Canadian forces during WWII.  They were our allies, and this was still going on! NO SUCH LAW WAS IMPOSED AGAINST EUROPEAN IMMIGRANTS. The Chinese residents and natural citizen already there even had to get a special permit to alert the government of their residency and alert the government of any traveling plans they had.  

   I mean, come on!!!  The governments’ treatment of these poor immigrants was just a pile of SH** And this type of conversation and treatment went on clear up through the late 1900s!!! How sick is that?!?  Some of the laws were in place as late as the 1980s!  Seriously, that’s basically within my lifetime — less than 30 years.  I have young friends who were alive then!

Now, excuse me.  I think I’ll go scream at the ignorance of idiots right now. . . 

 

Normandy Beach Memorial Sketched in Sand

13 Nov

We’ve all read the history books that quote the facts: Names, Dates, Medals won, Statistics; but it’s hard to really bring those facts to life in all their significance. There have been books, films, radio shows, and pictures that convey portions and glimpses into what the soldiers face, but still something is missing. We have seen the horror in the blood, and the screams, and the war–but we lose track of the Continue reading

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He Signed the First Atomic Bomb

8 Mar

He Sign the First Atomic Bomb

Hats off to some of the most brilliant and determined people of a generation.  Whether or not you agree with the dropping of the bomb, you have to admit that it took guts and changed our future forever.  I can’t imaging having the courage to even get close to the thing, much less put my name on it!  Personally, I’d have been in the country over (or perhaps Brazil. . . somewhere very far away!

Kanagawa Prefectural Museum

17 Feb
The Museum

Kanagawa Prefectural Museum

Okay, I admit it. I’m from a VERY small town in a VERY small country, so my local county museum consisted of the old mansion home of a local famous/wealthy horse breeder, an old schoolhouse, and about a dozen ancient oil lamps and doilies.  So in my mind, county museums mean small, not a whole lot to see, and an interesting hour or two.

Well, over the summer I was visiting Yokohama and ended up with a couple hours to spare. Since I was in the area, I decided to visit the Kanagawa Prefectural Museum, which is basically the city’s county museum.  Now, I’m thinking I’ll see an old building, maybe catch a few old photographs, and see some old pottery, while still making it out in time to grab some souvenirs for family. But what I didn’t take into account was the fact that Midwestern US museums’ greatest events are the soldiers leaving for WWI, WWII and the wars thereafter.

Kanagawa, on the other hand, has thousands of years of history spanning dozens of empires and centuries of religious, cultural, and social upheaval and development.  It’s survived hundreds of rulers, the bombings of WWII, the rise of Buddhism and the introduction of Christianity, the 1964 Olympics, and was the landing sight of Commodore Perry, the man who forcibly opened Japan to the west.  So what I found was practically another national Museum.

Now, everything was in Japanese (and I do mean everything, even the brochures were untranslated).  But it was also empty, so all the people were standing around waiting for people to come.  They saw me wandering around and before I knew what was going on I have 4 different employees following me around with a translator machine explaining all the exhibits and what they meant.  I got my own personal tour of this awesome place!  Everyone was incredibly kind, and my visit (which actually took 3+ hours) was an unexpectedly amazing event.

I apologize for the quality of these photos, I ran out of film earlier in the day and was stuck with my Ipod. 😦  Still, they show what an amazing history this place has!

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They also had Buddha statues, more sculptures than I could count, dozens of ancient maps, stunning paintings, and some amazing photography, as well as many other artifacts and cultural resources.  It was a wonderful place to visit!

If you’re in the area and want to stop by, you can find out more information about the Museum here.  I think it cost me about $6-7 total, but I don’t quite remember.  Museums in Japan are more expensive than those in Korea, but I remember that this one wasn’t too bad.  Great place to visit and it’s right down from Kannai street (a famous shopping street in Yokohama).  Look it up!

The Jedburghs: Spies, Espionage, and Sabotage!

29 Jan

Operation Jedburgh:

Spies, Espionage, and Sabotage

WWII was a war unlike any the world had seen before, and not just in the monstrous brutality so viciously enacted in the course of those few years.  There was also the fact that, for the first time in history, this was a war focused upon covert operations and guerrilla warfare.

In other words. . . this was a war of spies.   Continue reading

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